The Caffeinated Internship Series, Part II: The Resume

Welcome to Part 2 of my internship series! In this series of blog posts, I give advice on the internship search (a lot of which can also be applied to the entry level job search)! I’ve scored my share of life-changing internships, so I’m super excited to pass on what I’ve learned to all of you.

You know how people always go, “Oh, she looked good on paper, but she wasn’t great in person,” or “He wasn’t impressive on paper, but he’s really awesome when you meet him!”?

We’re going to work on getting you to be fantastic both on paper and in person. But first things first: Paper. Because usually before you wow them in the interview, you have to wow them on paper. Starting with a necessary evil: The resume.

The Caffeinated Resume

How does one caffeinate their resume? Two things:

  • Clean design
  • Compelling, specific job descriptions

That’s it. Easier said than done, though.

Clean design

A well-designed resume doesn’t mean an over-the-top resume. The best resumes are often the simplest, and you don’t need to be a graphic design whiz to make sure your resume looks pretty and polished. Here are my best pointers:

  • Choose one or two design elements that stand out. Do you want your name to be in a unique, handwritten cursive font? Do you have a cool logo? Are you all about the borders? Pick a couple distinctive aspects, and make the rest as simple as possible. If you’ve already developed a personal brand, this is a good place to incorporate any colors and designs that speak to your brand.
  • Use a simple body font that’s easy to read on all computers and mobile devices: Like Arial, Calibri, Cambria, Didot, Garamond, Georgia and Helvetica.
  • If you don’t feel comfy in Photoshop or InDesign, use Canva or a similar (free!) online design program that makes graphic design easy for normal people. Canva used to be my best-kept secret for looking like a design wizard.
  • Use an understated palette with one bold accent color. Mine is white, gray and black, but I use pink for a few of the design elements as an accent. I love pink, but I don’t want to overwhelm the people looking at my experience.
  • Put the most important information at the top. Your name, website, and most relevant experience should all be at the tippy-top.
  • Ditch the objective section. Your resume is about what you are doing for the company, not what the company can do for your personal goals.
  • Pretty paper is a plus. We know that resumes should always be printed on nice, heavy paper, but depending on your field, you might want to take it a step up. My resume is a watercolor design, so I print it on watercolor paper!

Above all:

  • Focus on your achievements. Sometimes if you go too crazy with the design, you take away from what the hiring manager should really be looking at, which is your amazing experience! Keep the spotlight on your words and keep the design simple.

Let’s talk about highlighting some of those achievements next!

Compelling job descriptions

  • Keywords, keywords, keywords. They’re like the hashtags on an Instagram post: If you don’t use them, people won’t find you. Same goes for a resume. If you don’t use words in your resume that match the words in the job posting, the hiring managers might not even see your resume. It’s no secret that lot of those online systems will sort through resumes based on whether they match the keywords in the job description, but a lot of people still have no idea that this is a thing. Unfortunately, it is a thing, so play the game and put in those keywords!

For example: If the job description says “Event planning experience a plus,” you can write in one of your bullet points, “Planned events, including blah blah blah.” Better yet, you can include “Event planning” in the Skills section.

  • Use action words: I know you know this one, but I’m saying it anyways. “Organized. Managed. Coordinated. Maintained. Led. Created.” You get the gist.
  • Give examples: Be specific in what you did. Sticking with the event planning example: When you say “Planned events,” you can be more specific by saying, “Planned events with increased attendance and fundraising efforts, including the 5K for the Cure that had a record 17,000 attendees.”
  • Humble brag: The resume is the place to do it. You have no doubt done something great, so stand up and shout it from the rooftops (in the most objective way possible). Numbers are the best way to do this, like “Increased participation by 70%” or in my own PR case, “Secured a placement in Blah Blah Magazine, resulting in over One Gajillion impressions.”

There you have it- my favorite pointers for creating a beautiful resume. There are so many different directions to take your personal style, but don’t forget to let your experience shine! Sound off in the comments if you have your own tips and tricks. Best of luck when you send that baby out!!

XO,

CC

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